#1
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HI IM CHERIL MY SON ASHTON IS 5 HE WAS DIAGNOSED 2 YEAR AGO NOW WITH AUTISM AND LEARNING DIFFICULTIES, AND TBH ONLY NOW IS IT STARTING TO SINK IN TO ME.. IM NEW HERE AND THROUGH OUT THE PAST 2 YEAR HAVE TRIED TO SELF EVALUATE THINGS MY SELF AND HOPE THEYVE GOT THINGS WRONG ASHTON WAS MY FIRST CHILD AND NOW I HAVE MYLIE I REALISE HOW DIFFERENT THINGS ARE AS I DIDNT REALISE WITH ASHTON COS HAD NO COMPARRISON BUT ITS DRIVING ME CRAZY NOW ALL THE THINKING AND WONDERING ABOUT WHAT THE FUTURE BRINGS AS NO 1 HAS BOTHERED TO ACTUALLY EXPLAIN THINGS N I GET FOBBED OFF WHEN I ASK, ASHTON DOESNT SPEAK AT ALL IVE NEVER HEARD HIM SAY 1 WORD HE JUST SCREECHES HE IS IN SPECIAL SCHOOL AND HAS BEEN FOR THE PAST YEAR... IVE ASKED EVERY HEALTH CARE PROFFESSIONAL AT WHAT PART OF THE SPECTRUM HES ON I MEAN IS IT SEVERE OR MILD AND NO 1 EVER GIVES ME A STRAIGHT ANSWER, HIS SOCIAL SKILLS ARE VERY POOR AS WITH MANY AUTISTIC CHILDREN HES STILL IN NAPPIES AND AS FAR AS IM AWARE DOESNT UNDERSTAND WHEN HES GOING TO THE TOILET HES SUCH A HAPPY LIL BOY THOU DOES FLAP HIS HANDS RUN ABOUT AND NEVER STOPS LOL, BUT HES LATELY STARTED NIPPING AND BITING ME AND BITES HIS OWN HAND CONSTANTLY, WHAT IM REALLY WANTING TO KNOW FROM PPLS EXPREIENCES IS IS THIS ON THE SEVERE END OF THE SCALE AND WILL IT BE LIKELY THAT HE WILL TALK??? I LOVE HIM TOO BITS AND JUST WANT TO KNOW HOW BEST TO HELP HIM ANY ANSWERS WOULD BE GREAT
#2
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Hi there,

I know how you feel, my little man was diagnosed with autism in January. Its his birthday today, he was 3 and had absolutely no clue what was happening and was afraid of his candles and I just feel a little lost tonight.

When my son was diagnosed I asked where he was on the spectrum and the Dr wouldnt give me a straight answer.... I know my son is not mild, he is definately at the severe end, he was non-verbal until a few months back when he started attempting a few words but he doesnt have any functional speech and just leads me by the hand to show me what he wants. Awful social skills, virtually no eye contact and has a routine for everything! He is bright though, he already knows his shapes, colours, numbers to 12 and capital letters, and attempts to say these words but not clearly.

I have heard of children talking later than 5 so there is definately hope that your son will talk...does he have speech therapy?

I would read up on autism, there are alot of good books on amazon which can give you ideas on how to try and help your son.

Feel free to message me if you want to talk some more...hugs...

Proud mum of 3...... Dani,13, amazing child....Sofie,11, my smiler, physically disabled, 3 strokes aged 2, speech issues, learning difficulties, epilepsy.... and Luke,2, diagnosed with autism January 2011, non-verbal cheeky chappy.
#3
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My little boy ben has asd and think that it's on the severe end as he is non verbal and still in nappies. Ben has improved a little bit which is good. have to thank is special needs school for that
#4
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hi, i think your son is in the middle! im saying this because my son is growing up with the support of an autistic group.
my young man is on the high functioning end of the autistic scale. he talks, takes direction and generally "fits in". he still wears nappies but takes it off when he has filled it!
my friends son is on the low end of the autistic spectrum. he does not talk - does his own thing, wears a handling belt to grab him quickly and guide him. he does not sit and eat - wears nappies etc.
there are older adults in our support group - in the "low-middle". they do work - but do things like mow grass,work in sainsburys, help in nursery etc. ALL have a full life. (though it is the autistic nature to moan!) your son may not choose to speak, even if he learns....he may not choose the company of other people....he will need some support, but thank goodness we live in the times we do -

stay postive,
#5
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Hi. really know where you are coming from. was just like describing my son Malachy who is 5 also. Non verbal, in nappies etc. Mal was diagnosed aged 20 months. Very young but think cause symptoms so evident. My daughter was born 16 months after Mal & I remember noticing the differences in their development & being astounded. We were & still are told he is severe autism. The doctor didn’t diagnose ASD, but Kanners autism or Classic autism, which is on the severe end of the autism spectrum. This isn’t a wildly term used but I found it helpful to research Kanners autism. Maybe you should ask if this is what your son has. And my understanding is that the more severe the autism then the learning difficulty comes in because autism will not hold a child back in all areas so if their development is delayed across the board then that when an associated learning difficulty comes in. My son has recently been diagnosed with ADHD but is not on meds yet. And also has major sensory integration difficulties. Like your son He bites & nips himself and others continuously & also squeezes me mostly round the neck which isn’t the nice! My understanding is that these inappropriate behaviours are sensory lead. Mal is always running jumping spinning etc & that because he is seeking out proprio-ceptive (spelt wrong) sense. The sensory element of autism is very complicated & I read up & seek advise of OTs but really hard to get head around. One time it was explained to me that all senses are buckets which the autistic child works really hard to fill up. Example is seeking out deep pressure by squeezing or fitting into small spaces. But then what happens is they do it too much which causes the bucket to overflow which then starts spilling into other senses bucket which cause child to have complete melt down & very distressed. The key is so give the child appropriate sensory input throughout the day to stop them seeking it out themselves because they cant control. Just realised Ive went on a bit!!! Sorry…. Advise I would say is try not and focus on where he is on the spectrum or what his learning difficulty is but rather the essence of the child and what his needs are. Let me know how you’re getting on. Cat


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