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(I'm not sure I have put this in the right part because I'm not very computer savvy.)
When I applied for DLA we got the care component but not the mobility component for my son who has ASD. The main reason I wanted to get the mobility was to get a blue badge (I tried applying for the blue badge anyway & was turned down). My son can walk but has no sense of danger - will run off, not stop if I shout, run across roads in front of traffic, argue about the way/lie down on the pavement/road etc - particularly anywhere new or busy like shops etc. A lot of the time I need to take him in the buggy because I can't trust him to be safe as he can quickly slip his hand out of my grip and go. A friend said that you cannot get the lower rate of mobility until the child is 5. Would it be worth me reapplying when he is 5 and I might get the lower rate - might we then be able to get a blue badge? Grateful for any advice. PS in my original application I found a lot of useful information on the NAS website as well to show what the wording means and what the definitions are - mind you I would dread doing it all again.
#2
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(10-14-2009, 10:01 AM)bessie Wrote: (I'm not sure I have put this in the right part because I'm not very computer savvy.)
When I applied for DLA we got the care component but not the mobility component for my son who has ASD. The main reason I wanted to get the mobility was to get a blue badge (I tried applying for the blue badge anyway & was turned down). My son can walk but has no sense of danger - will run off, not stop if I shout, run across roads in front of traffic, argue about the way/lie down on the pavement/road etc - particularly anywhere new or busy like shops etc. A lot of the time I need to take him in the buggy because I can't trust him to be safe as he can quickly slip his hand out of my grip and go. A friend said that you cannot get the lower rate of mobility until the child is 5. Would it be worth me reapplying when he is 5 and I might get the lower rate - might we then be able to get a blue badge? Grateful for any advice. PS in my original application I found a lot of useful information on the NAS website as well to show what the wording means and what the definitions are - mind you I would dread doing it all again.

Hi Bessie,
I moved your thread to the help sectionTongue
You are testing my skills,as i had to work out how to do thatHuh

Right in regards to your Motability questions and Blue Badge questions:

Lets seperate these for ease:

Motability allowance-
Many parents with children with Autism get turned down for Mobilty allowance and parents are frustrated about this,i get the impression the goverment do not take Autism as seriously as they should.
They often turn down on IQ tests alone,IQ may be the starting point but it is not definitive; useful intelligence has to be considered instead.

I am going to define this into 2 section'sBlush


May I suggest a read of CSDLA/202/2007, in which the Commissioner sets out a possible case for high rate mobility.
Section 73 of the Contributions and benefits Act provides that a person may be entitled to HRM for several reasons not all directly related to being unable physically to walk - being both blind and deaf, for example.

The one we are looking at is: "he is severely mentally impaired, and he displays severe behavioural problems" (and he must also be getting the highest rate of care).

The meaning of this provision is then explained in Regulation 12 of the Disability Living Allowance Regs which say that "severe behavioural problems" means "disruptive behaviour which is extreme, and regularly requires another person to intervene and physically restrain him in order to prevent him caused physical injury to himelf or another, or damage to property; and is so unpredictable that he requires another person to be present and watching over him whenever he is awake".

"Severely mentally impaired" means "arrested development or incomplete physical development of the brain, which results in severe impairment of intelligence and social functioning."

severely disabled children aged 3 and 4 who have difficulty walking may be able to get the higher rate of DLA for getting around.

Severely disabled is likely to be defined as-

Children with severe learning disabilities,

Children with the most severe forms of autism,

Children with severe cerebral palsy,

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

Spinal muscular atrophy;

Congenital myopathies;

Spina bifida; Head injury;

Encephalitis/meningitis;

Spinal cord injury.

Limb Defects.

Brittle bone disease.

Arthritis.

Cardiac and respiratory disorders - particularly broncho-pulmonary dysplasia, but also in the most severely affected children with more common cardiorespiratory disorders e.g. congenital heart disease and asthma.

Sensory impairments - blindness, deafness and with particular problems with those children who are deaf/blind

So if there is a case of severe Autism then Higher rate mobility allowance is allowed under current law and guidance.
Important things to think about with regards to the Higher rate would be:

not understanding that emergency vehicles can travel on both sides of the road
lack of attention caused by obsessions (eg reading car number plates without paying attention to traffic)
phobias (eg of dogs or crowds)
abnormal responses to sensations (eg difficulty judging distances and speed of cars or responding to loud noises by covering the ears and refusing to walk on).

But if you did decide to wait until your little one turns 5 then obviously lower rate is an option as the criteria for this stands as follows:

When assessing your child's ability to walk the DWP will take into account:

the speed at which s/he can walk
the length of time s/he can walk
the manner in which s/he walks
the amount of discomfort s/he experiences as a result of getting from one place to another.
You will need to show that, on occasion, your child is temporarily unable to move. These interruptions must happen often enough, and last long enough, to be considered normal and routine.
Looking for sensory toys at affordable prices then look no further

Sensory toys for children with special needs CLICK HERE
#3
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Blue Badge-

Some people with ASD who do not receive the higher rate mobility component of the Disability Living Allowance would still qualify for a Blue Badge because they meet the criteria of having a permanent and substantial disability which causes inability to walk or very considerable difficulty in walking, as described above in my post.
This is a discretionary award however, and open to interpretation by your local council. Some local authorities have a more generous attitude to autistic spectrum disorders.
I would suggest applying for the badge and compiling a dossier of evidence and also ask your doctor or specialist to write you a support letter and include this within the application for the Badge.
Believe me you can get a badge outside of the current rules although some smart alec will tell you there is not way.
Go through to your local adult and communities team and they maybe able to help you further on this but if they say NO still APPLY!!!!
Looking for sensory toys at affordable prices then look no further

Sensory toys for children with special needs CLICK HERE
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My son gets the lower rate mobilty benefit. I too was under the impression you could not apply for a Blue badge without receiving the higher rate but I applied and gave them the name and address of my sons consultant and on her advice he was given a Blue Badge. It is definitely worth giving it a go.
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Hi Bessie,

I have often found that your GP is a good place to start to get help. Although my son is severely physically disabled so his problems are more obvious, there have been issues with getting stuff.
If you have a good understanding GP ask them for help. They probably wont charge for letters or they will at least be asking the questions of why you were refused when you so obviously need it and deserve it.

Just a thought!


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