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Hello All,
This is my first post, I have been readinf some of the posts as a guest and found it really useful.

I am the mother of Tom who was diagnosed with an ASD a year ago

At this time, Tom ate a pretty good selection of foods.
It was probably limited compared to many typically developing children but compared to what I heard and read about other ASD children, i think he was doing really well
However since he was diagnosed, Toms eating habits have changed.
He just suddenly, one day, decided that he would no longer eat foods that he had been eating every day before.
Now when I used to have a choice of about 8 dishes what I would class as evening meals I now have to choose from 2, chicken nuggets or fish fingers.
So here we are 2 choices of meals and no other options?
Now what do i do?
#2
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Hi Maggie Smile

This is absolutely typical of ASD children, and a difficult one! As you know, it's not just a case of 'faddy eating', but there are a few reasons. This could be anything from sensory texture, food colour, food presentation or even minor changes such as a change of seating, plate etc. How old is Tom?

Try not to put too much pressure on yourself, as we do, that he's not getting what he needs. Chicken nuggets and fish fingers are protein, does he eat anything else such as chips with them? Maybe try to keep a 'food diary' as you will be surprised, honestly, he's probably eating more than what you think Smile

I was also given something to think about myself recently - often with ASD children there is an element of control with eating habits, particularly I think with older children. You could try to put small amounts of food that he has eaten before on his plate, or, if you feel that's too much, on a side plate. If he 'kicks off', remove it without comment. Each time, try leave it a little longer each time. It's easy to say, I know, but don't show that you're stressed or upset, but give gentle encouragement. With time and persistance of regularly doing the same thing you may get results, especially if you use foods he's already familiar with. If you are offering the food calmly, it gives your son the feeling of being in control in refusing, but if you give no reaction it gives the control back to you. It's hard I know, but worth a try.

Unless he is losing a lot of weight in a short space of time, although we worry of course as parents, try not to (again easier said than done Smile)

Let us know how you get on, maybe someone else may have some other ideas.

Hope this helps a lttle - Maggie x
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(10-13-2009, 02:03 PM)MaggieMay Wrote: Hi Maggie Smile

This is absolutely typical of ASD children, and a difficult one! As you know, it's not just a case of 'faddy eating', but there are a few reasons. This could be anything from sensory texture, food colour, food presentation or even minor changes such as a change of seating, plate etc. How old is Tom?

Try not to put too much pressure on yourself, as we do, that he's not getting what he needs. Chicken nuggets and fish fingers are protein, does he eat anything else such as chips with them? Maybe try to keep a 'food diary' as you will be surprised, honestly, he's probably eating more than what you think Smile

I was also given something to think about myself recently - often with ASD children there is an element of control with eating habits, particularly I think with older children. You could try to put small amounts of food that he has eaten before on his plate, or, if you feel that's too much, on a side plate. If he 'kicks off', remove it without comment. Each time, try leave it a little longer each time. It's easy to say, I know, but don't show that you're stressed or upset, but give gentle encouragement. With time and persistance of regularly doing the same thing you may get results, especially if you use foods he's already familiar with. If you are offering the food calmly, it gives your son the feeling of being in control in refusing, but if you give no reaction it gives the control back to you. It's hard I know, but worth a try.

Unless he is losing a lot of weight in a short space of time, although we worry of course as parents, try not to (again easier said than done Smile)

Let us know how you get on, maybe someone else may have some other ideas.

Hope this helps a lttle - Maggie x

I see what you mean actually about other foods because he does eat chips as well.
I jus wish he would eat more choices so i dont have to cook so many meals for everybodyAngelBlush
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Maggie, I had a wry chuckle at your post, I know exactly what you mean! My son will only eat the same things all the time, but I'm luckier than most mums as he will eat vegetables, things like shepherd's pie, roast beef. Not Pizza, chips, beans or anything like that, so on our pizza night I'm still making him mashed potatoes, chicken and veg! We can't eat out either as he won't eat anywhere else, can you go out to eat with Tom?
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I have this problem too. I find its a constant battle trying to get him to eat his least favourite things (out of the tiny limited choice of things he will eat) just so that he will not drop more things off. Its constant arguments and I'm sure he would just drop back down to only eating milk and raspberry yoghurt if he could get away with it! Mainly I just go with it but always make him have the apricot or peach yoghurt by saying all the rasberries have gone etc & just repeating that its that or nothing - just little things like this. I freeze things for him like mashed potato in little bags so I can just defrost them in the microwave which makes it a bit easier.

I also do this as well on a side plate -
"" You could try to put small amounts of food that he has eaten before on his plate, or, if you feel that's too much, on a side plate. If he 'kicks off', remove it without comment. Each time, try leave it a little longer each time. It's easy to say, I know, but don't show that you're stressed or upset, but give gentle encouragement. With time and persistance of regularly doing the same thing you may get results, especially if you use foods he's already familiar with. If you are offering the food calmly, it gives your son the feeling of being in control in refusing, but if you give no reaction it gives the control back to you. It's hard I know, but worth a try. ""

Its amazing what they can do though - my son had all the blood tests and although low in iron he was the correct weight for his height!!! & that was living on peanut butter sandwiches, crackers, mashed potato & yoghurt!
Also I got abidec multivitamins on prescription to put in his drinks & also iron drops (but he wont take the iron).


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